Öhlins TTX25 Gas Charge

Maintaining the nitrogen charge in your shocks is the most simple, and yet most critical step in keeping your shocks functioning properly.  With inadequate charge shocks are likely to cavitate, prematurely leak, and behave inconsistently.  The steps below will help you keep your shocks properly charged with nitrogen.  Note it is not possible to check or read the current pressure in your shocks with a gauge.  This is because whatever you insert to check the charge will create new volume causing incorrect measurement.  Whenever you check or charge shocks you want to complete the full process of recharging the shock with nitrogen.

 

Release Gas Charge

  1. Remove torx head screw from gas canister end cap  Pic1
  2. Apply a small amount of grease to Öhlins gas fill needle adapter (U00050-16)
  3. Carefully pierce the bladder with the gas fill needle and thread in for stability  Pic1
  4. Depress Schrader valve core to release charge
  5. Carefully remove the gas fill needle

Charge Shock

  1. If needed remove torx head screw from gas canister end cap  Pic1
  2. Apply a small amount of grease to Öhlins gas fill needle adapter (U00050-16)
  3. Carefully pierce the bladder with the gas fill needle and thread it in for stability
  4. Attach Kaz Charge Tool to Öhlins gas fill needle adapter
  5. Screw in the plunger of the no-loss air chuck on the Kaz Charge Tool which will depress the valve core of the fill adapter tying all reservoirs together  Pic1
  6. Fill the shock with nitrogen at the Schrader valve of the Kaz Charge Tool
  7. Bleed off pressure using the Schrader valve until the gauge indicates the desired pressure
  8. Back out the plunger of the no-loss air chuck on the Kaz Charge Tool which will isolate the gas reservoirs preventing nitrogen loss from the shock  Pic1
  9. Detach the Kaz Charge Tool from the Öhlins gas fill needle adapter
  10. Carefully remove the gas fill needle adapter
  11. Reinstall the torx head screw into the gas canister end cap  Pic1

Verify shock operation

  1. Check that the shock is charged and will extend on its own
  2. Check that the shock will fully extend to a firm stop
  3. Check that the shock will fully compress
  4. If the shock does not fully compress or properly extend, it is likely the floating piston is not positioned correctly, or the shock contains air and has not been properly bled
  5. Test shock in a shock dyno and verify the forces are correct, the adjusters behave properly, and there is no cavitation or excessive hysteresis

 

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